Poem of the Week: The Run of the Downs by Rudyard Kipling

09 August 2012

{Because my blog tour will be making stops every Friday during the month of August, my Poem of the Week link-up has been temporarily moved to Thursdays until September.}

This poem could practically be called Violet Bradshaw's heart-song, as it names many places she holds dear. Reading it was better than scrolling through pages of research; in a minute, my image of Vi's world back in England was widened and the colors intensified. It's a delicious poem with a soft strain of reluctance hidden behind the lines.

waves
pinterest: ocean by anna olivia

The Run of the Downs
By Rudyard Kipling

THE WEALD is good, the Downs are best – 
I'll give you the run of 'em, East to West.
Beachy Head and Winddoor Hill,
They were once and they are still.
Firle Mount Caburn and Mount Harry
Go back as far as sums '1l carry.
Ditchling Beacon and Chanctonbury Ring
They have looked on many a thing, 
And what those two have missed between 'em
I reckon Truleigh Hill has seen 'em. 
Highden, Bignor and Duncton Down
Knew Old England before the Crown.
Linch Down, Treyford and Sunwood
Knew Old England before the Flood;
And when you end on the Hampshire side – 
Butser's old as Time and Tide.
The Downs are sheep, the Weald is corn,
You be glad you are Sussex born! 

Link up with your poems below!

2 epistles:

  1. Lovely post Lizzy!But although you can't become a dancer you can very well be inspired to become a dancer.
    R.

    ReplyDelete
  2. well first of all, that photo just takes my breath away.
    and secondly, the poem is lovely! one of my favorite poems of all time is another by Rudyard Kipling, "If." if you haven't read it--go now. it's beautiful.
    and thank you m'dear for your sweet comment on my blog! I'm of the opinion that to agree in good literature is to agree in everything, no? ;)

    ReplyDelete

"Gracious words are like a honeycomb; sweetness to the soul and health to the body." —Proverbs 16:24

Related Posts with Thumbnails